History

20 years ago, the question on the November 6, 1990 General Election Ballot appeared as follows:


Question Number 3
CONSTITUTIONAL QUESTION
MARYLAND CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION

Should a Constitutional Convention be called for the purpose of altering the State Constitution or framing a new Constitution?


The people voted YES in 1930 and 1950 but the legislature declined to convene a Convention on some perceived wording technicality about what a “majority” was.

Then comes Governor J. Millard Tawes. On June 16th 1965 he established the Commission by Executive Order. In 1967 he said, “I regard this act as one of the outstanding achievements of my administration.” When the new Constitution was put to the people, it was rightly rejected. Too many reasons to type here.

It was also challenged in the Maryland Court of Appeals.  The Court of Appeals then made clear that the people of Maryland retain “the inalienable right to alter, reform or abolish their Form of Government in such manner as they may deem expedient, and thus may call for a Convention whenever we choose.”
Page 263

DECLARATION OF RIGHTS.  Article 1. That all Government of right originates from the People, is founded in compact only, and instituted solely for the good of the whole; and they have, at all times, the inalienable right to alter, reform or abolish their Form of Government in such manner as they may deem expedient.

Article 6. That all persons invested with the Legislative or Executive powers of Government are the Trustees of the Public, and, as such, accountable for their conduct: Wherefore, whenever the ends of Government are perverted, and public liberty manifestly endangered, and all other means of redress are ineffectual, the People may, and of right ought, to reform the old, or establish a new Government; the doctrine of non-resistance against arbitrary power and oppression is absurd, slavish and destructive of the good and happiness of mankind.

Our Rights. Declared.

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